Management News

Shaping the Future

In today’s service-led, cloud-centric, and API-connected business landscape, monolithic software struggles to keep up with the rapid development of new innovations, tools, and platforms. In this ‘always on’ and ‘always connected’ world, it is no longer feasible to release software products on a multi-month or multi- year development cycle. Microservices is the architecture of choice for companies seeking a highly scalable, costeffective, and resilient approach which helps them operate in a fast-moving business climate....

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A Fresh Lease of Life

An underperforming company is one in which return on investment drops below the cost of capital, and shareholders rightfully ask whether the enterprise should be wound up, assets sold, and the freed capital be invested in more lucrative opportunities. Recent amendments to bankruptcy laws in India to tackle NPAs suggest empowering asset reconstruction companies to act like receivers who focus on winding up operations...

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Learning Curve

The great Swiss clinical psychologist Jean Piaget once remarked that the principal goal of education should be to create people who are capable of doing new things, people who are creative, inventive, and discoverers, and not simply repeating what other generations have done. This approach has permeated various societies through the ages, and is finally also shaping the argument for Indian education moving away from rote learning.

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Astep in the Right Direction

Promotion Board (FIPB) is also a good sign which underlines the continued liberalisation intent of the government;it is good for both startups and established cornpanies on the lookout for growth capital.The only additional rnove this sector could have benefit from are some new tax benefits to further safeguard the interests of the IT industry,which is under tremendous pressure from anti-globalisation sentiments and new visa reforms being tabled by the US administration.

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Tech Gains

The IT sector can now be a true partner to new skills initiatives by enabling technology to provide support to trainers and mentors and address the gargantuan task of getting 300 million Indians ready for employment and entrepreneurship through compelling content served through technology platforms.

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Budgetis Not taxing

The budget reduced the personal income two rate from 10,0 to 5./0,on income in the,2.5-5 lakh slab.This is a Political & amp; good move since a majority of salari taxpayers in a middle-income nation like India fall in this slab.It increases disposable incorne by, 12,500 in the hands of all whose income is, 2.5 lakh and above.But those with income only up to 5 lakh will see an effective impact of 10,000 not 12,500.

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For a smooth glide

in place, a family business can survive for many generations. In a family-owned business, the influence and control of the founder is usually considered indisputable and the whole business revolves around him or her, which should not be the case ideally. But there are times when such leaders have to step aside and let others carry on their legacy

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Rising to the challenge of succession planning in family firms

challenges that families and businesses across the world face during a succession process. These include cultural issues, the transferral of family assets and competency. The first three are:
• The challenge of succession culture
• The challenge of transferring family assets
• The challenge of being competent

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Managing leadership change

Letting go is one of the most difficult and challenging aspects of leadership. Controlling and deciding what is to be done, when, how, and by whom—all of these become habit-forming and heady, and difficult to let go. It is particularly problematic in organisations where the CEO is also the dominant stakeholder, or belongs to the promoter family.

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Back to the Future

Business schools are facing an existential crisis. Their legitimacy as providers of management education and repositories of management wisdom are being challenged as never before. Worldwide, declining enrolments in MBA programmes—the traditional standard-bearer of management education—are one symptom; the increasing marginalisation of business school research and its divorce from the needs of industry is another

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Breakout growth strategies

I wanted to tape this lecture about the future of the MBA degree programmes. I believe MBA degree, as we know it today, is not sustainable. Like many good products, it may have probably run its course—unless somebody redesigns the programme, certification or accreditation is changed, and the financials are made much more attractive. I would suggest several ‘breakout strategies,’ non-traditional strategies to create growth in the future for the MBA programme

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Beyond the classroom

The education system today is designed to impart distinctions to students through the use of terminology/language and concepts, that allows them to see the nuances of the field of study which are not apparent to others. For example, a medical student gets equipped with language (and of course concepts) that allows him to see human body differently from someone who has not studied medicine.

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Are you work-ready?

Sydney D Harris famously said, “The whole purpose of education is to turn mirrors into windows.” He makes an important distinction—a mirror only reflects what is in front of it, while a window provides a vision to what is beyond.

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Revamp, need of the hour

In the past few decades, business school education in India has changed significantly. Though the number of schools has gone up, the quality of education provided by a large number of them remains questionable. Within the ambit of quality education, it is the curriculum, faculty, and the precise manner in which it is delivered that constitute the most important components.

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Case Study

Mozart Home Appliances Private Limited is a mediumsized home appliances company situated in Mumbai. It was founded by two school friends Ajay and Atul in the year 2005. Since childhood, Ajay was passionate about science and technology. He obtained an electrical engineering degree from a top-notch technology institute in India. Atul, on the other hand, always had a flair for business management and commerce.

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A case for teaching more than just the class

Over the decades, the case method has become entrenched and ingrained in the b-school ecosystem. It is the dominant religion of management teachers. Pioneered by Harvard School of Business in 1920, it now has universal following. It has become the default and de rigeur teaching method, as it is believed to engage students and teachers better than the lectures.

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Innovation and design: From design to design thinking

Design is the new alchemy. Some of the most valuable companies in the world, such as Apple, Samsung, IBM, and Nike, owe their wealth not to market dominance but their ability to conjure magic through design thinking and innovation. In fact, design thinking today is no longer restricted to products; it covers service offerings, operational process, and even policy-making.

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Making India a Global Marketing hub

while it is important for India to strive to become a global manufacturing hub like China, the country is perhaps more suited to become a global R&D hub.

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The Future of Work

It is the best of times and the worst of times for those who work for a living and even those who live to work.New technologies have made work less strenuous and employment less rigid than ever before.

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The next wave

When it comes to dealing with big data, it is not the amount of data that is necessarily important. It is what organisations are able to do with the data that matters. Understanding what big data can offer, and unlocking the potential benefits, will help propel organisations towards a more secure and efficient future.

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Big Data and How it is Transforming Business

Business managers have never known more about their businesses than they do now. Today's managers have unprecedented power to identify opportunities and tweak processes for greater efficiency and competitiveness. The presence of digital technology in every business action and transaction is producing extensive data on nearly everything. Importantly,the overwhelming volume, variety, and speed of data generation are beginning to be matched by the growth of computing power and the advancement of analytics tools.

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Age of Marketing

Reports of the marketing's death are greatly exaggerated.if anything, marketing is back in the saddle and directing bussiness after a decade of rule of the CFOc,thanks to the unprecedented changes in the market.

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Creating Bonds that bind

To quote Harry Paul, co-author of Fish!, "culture is like wind you really cannot see it but you can feel it...harnessed correctly, it create its own energy or has devastating consequences on your sorroundings that are noticeable. Same thing in an organisation where there is a culture."

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Leadership Secrets

Striking a balance between generating results and fastreing relationships is the key to long-term success.

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Organisational Culture

In the perenniel search for the secrets of success, it is easy to take the effect as the cause, Enterprise, leadership, or innovation often explain corporate success to the casual observer.

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Cyber Security

Digital technology and the hyperconnectivity it brings along have revolutionised businesses and modes of communication. However, a high digital quotient has a negative spin too: it exposes organisations to the complex challenge of cyber threats. A massive treasure trove of data—financial details, R&D records, customer information, and so on—is potentially at a high risk of pilferage, upsetting your operational stability and denting your brand image. How best can you grapple with these perils?

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A Wake Up Call

This year, my pre-Diwali shopping turned out to be a pleasant experience- considering that I did not have to wait in a long queue at the billing counter. I was in and out of a popular national department store in an upmarket Mumbai suburb in less than 45 minutes. While I was happy with the experience, it also set me thinking on the changes that were taking place, especially in retail in India. While the change is largely being driven by technology, the emergence of the 24/7 culture and a large youth population willing to spend have fuelled the demand for many products and services.

The country has also witnessed a new breed of entrepreneurs, and startups which are garnering record venture capital investments and increased valuations. In an age of constant connectivity and social media influence, retail to say the least is being revolutionised and for once the consumer is actually emerging as the king.

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Hand in hand

Over the past half a decade, e-commerce in general has seen a dramatic growth in the Indian market. The success of Flipkart, Snapdeal, Myntra, Jabong, and several others in various product categories, from groceries (Bigbasket) to baby products (Babyoye), is a clear indicator of the gradual shift from brick-andmortar retail towards e-commerce—at least among those who were born in this era.

Comparisons and contest between the two is not new. We saw the same debate when organised retail stepped in and one wondered if the days of the local mom and pop stores were numbered. We even witnessed similar promotional efforts by the spanking new malls dotting the city’s landscape. Big sales, special initiatives such as Big Bazaar’s purana do naya lo (give old and buy new), and a number of promotional campaigns helped drive traffic and inculcate the ‘mall’ culture we have come to know so well. E-tail is doing pretty much the same—trying to drive adoption and inculcate the habit of online shopping.

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Levelling the playing field

While everyone is talking about online stores and their lower price points, people who really do understand the e-commerce business already know that a lot of that price competitiveness comes due to VC money, which is being used to offer further discounts on the purchase price set by the e-tailers. What is hugely debatable is whether [this model of] e-tailing is fundamentally flawed.

As per the current regulation, FDI investments in multi-channel retail cannot be more than 51%. This means that e-tailers cannot be retailers i.e., directly buying goods from the manufacturers and selling them to consumers. As a result, they have adopted a marketplace model wherein some wholesaler or retailer is the actual seller, using the e-tail portal to complete the transaction with the buyer. In the accounting books, the goods stay under the individual seller’s name, until the transaction is completed. The e-tailer usually provides logistic support in terms of warehousing, delivery, and collection of payments.

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When faith meets consumerism

Retailers in India, both offline and online, are at a crossroads. Initially massive discounts helped them garner customers and boost sales, but now they need to look further to build sustainable consumer loyalty. One of the aspects that play an important role in the way Indian consumers shop is their religiosity. For example, when a new car is bought, chances are the first trip the family takes is to the neighbourhood temple; priests also conduct new car-worthy special prayers. Marketers need to understand the Indian consumers’ religious proclivities and how it affects their day-to-day lives. Campaigns sensitive to these cultural differences will go a long way in building customer loyalty. In this exclusive with Indian Management, Ambi Parameswaran talks about the changing Indian consumer and how religion and rituals have become new avenues for seeking and spending cash.

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The dark side of contemporary careers

Researchers and the wider world tend to view pursuing a career as a positive thing. Success in the workplace is generally seen as a worthwhile and desirable goal both on a personal and social level. However, career experiences can also be negative, even devastating, can reflect failure, and may prompt feelings of indecision, stress, disappointment, and regret that we would rather avoid. They also possess a ‘dark side’ where notions like deviance, dysfunctionment, and counterproductivity find their place. While this dark side is not a new concept, there has been little coverage for it in established career concepts and theories, or even in contemporary approaches. This is not only naive, but carries a real risk.

A purely positive view of careers may incur harmful outcomes on individuals and firms alike. The false hope produced by positively loaded career promises might transform to frustration and lower ambition, which in turn can lead to failure and missed opportunities.

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Structuring teams for innovation

“Team work behind success of Mangalyaan” stated an article in The Hindu, when India made history by successfully launching an indigenously built spacecraft to Mars in her first try. What surprised the world was that the cost of the launch—US$ 74 million, nearly one-tenth the cost of a comparable launch by NASA. The team behind Mangalyaan comprised scientists and administrators from different functional areas who were experts in several disciplines such as rocket propulsion, payloads, range operations, range safety, schedules, and others. Although Mangalyaan is an extreme example of a radical innovation executed through successful teamwork, innovation teams are common in organisations. Innovation teams— those entrusted with developing new products, processes, or services—routinely grapple with complex issues that take them into unchartered territories. Such teams are particularly commonplace in complex manufacturing industries such as aircraft, automobiles, electronics, petroleum refineries, and power plants. Projects in such industries involve extensive task complexity, necessitating exemplary team coordination for successful execution.

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